Dublin City University

The goal of stimulating and promoting the creative capacity of both students and staff in higher education is at the core of this project. This initiative aims to foster a culture of creativity in higher education, building the capacity of staff so that they have greater awareness about the nature of creativity, how it applies in their particular discipline, and how they can actively cultivate it in their students.

The challenges stemming from our rapidly-changing, and increasingly unscripted world, demand that higher education institutions reflect upon the competencies which students will require in order to thrive in this context. Coupled with traditional discipline-specific knowledge, there is a growing demand for graduates to develop and demonstrate a variety of transversal competencies, among which is creativity; that is, the ability to generate ideas and outputs which are perceived as both novel and valuable within a given context. As such, educators have an important role to play in creating a culture which fosters creativity, including modelling creative practices and behaviours, establishing conditions which promote creativity, and developing students’ belief in their own creative potential. Indeed, this project is based on the principle that everyone has creative potential which can be actively fostered.

Credene Project

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This is a Moodle alternative to tools like Trello, Padlet, wallwisher etc. The plugin has many advantages over the existing commercial alternatives including areas such as accessibility, data protection and the fact that the student contributions when they use this tool can be easily used for assessment. The plugin will be available for all Moodle users worldwide free of charge.

This report arises from the #Openteach: Professional Development for Open Online Educators project, which is funded by the National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education.The #Openteach project team are based in the Open Education Unit (OEU) at Dublin City University (DCU).

The main aim of the #Openteach project was to produce, and evaluate, evidence-based open professional development for part-time online educators. In anearlier phase of the project a literature review called Teaching Online is Different: Critical perspectives from the literaturewas completed in order to identify online educator roles and the associated competencies for effective online teaching (Ní Shé, Farrell, Brunton, Costello, Donlon, Trevaskis, Eccles, 2019). Concurrently, we conducted a needs analysisreport of the target population, online students and their online educators (Farrell, Brunton, Costello, Donlon, Trevaskis, Eccles, Ní Shé, 2019). These reports were used to guide the development of the professional development resources for the #Openteach open online course.

This work arises from the #Openteach: Professional Development for Open Online Educators project, which is funded by the National Forum for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education. The #Openteach project team are based in the Open Education Unit (OEU) at Dublin City University (DCU). Formally known as the National Distance Education Centre and subsequently Oscail, the OEU is a provider of online, off-campus programmes through the DCU Connected platform. Throughout the years the mode of delivery moved gradually from that of a traditional distance education provider to incorporate more elements of online learning. A significant step in this process came in 2011, with the introduction of synchronous live online tutorials and the electronic delivery of modules in a virtual learning environment (Delaney & Farren, 2016; Farrell & Seery, 2019). Following an open and online learning philosophy, the OEU aims to afford educational opportunities to students who have not managed to access more traditional entry routes into higher education.

The #Openteach project aims to generate new knowledge about effective online teaching practice and to harness this new knowledge to support the professional development of online teachers and to more effectively support online student learning experiences.

#OpenTeach Website

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Students as Partners in Assessment (SAPIA)

This appendix infograph comes from a recent literature review which aims to demystify the ways in which those who teach can partner students by exploring initiatives such as involving them as self or peer assessors, as co-creators of assessment activities and marking criteria, and the use of collaborative opportunities to co-own the assessment process. 

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