The Application of Statistical Psychology to Crime and Justice: Demonstrating the ‘Dark Figure’ of Crime with Historical Example in the UK

Description

This lecture presents students, and professionals who are training in crime statistics reporting, with a concrete tutorial in how to critically evaluate government crime statistics with reference to public data collected from public surveys on their recounted experiences of crime.

Benefit of this resource and how to make the best use of it

Particularly of benefit to students and lecturers of criminology, psychology of law, and law, this tutorial uses historical crime statistics from Home Office UK reports from what was previously known as the British Crime Survey. The tutorial demonstrates the inconsistencies in police reported crime and crime reported in the same time period by a representative sample of people from public households in England & Wales. What’s more, the tutorial explores whether public fear of crime can be justified by crime’s extent. The tutorial presents a worked clear example of the ‘Dark Figure of Crime’ phenomenon, and provides detailed coverage of the following:

1. Advantages and disadvantages of police reporting v public reporting of crime,

2. Understanding the explanatory steps to attend to when discrepancies in official policing crime statistics, and official public crime reporting statistics arise,

3. The circumstances that brought about the ‘Simmons Report (2000)’,

4. Explanations for the rise in crime according to societal and psychological factors,

5. The ‘Social Psychological Fear of Crime Model’ of explanation regarding public perception of their likelihood to be victims of crime, regardless of crime statistics reporting,

6. The psychological consequences of victimization and how it relates to lack of crime reporting to the police in the first instance, and finally the presentation closes with an evaluation.

The lecture will be suitable to those working in social research and studying criminology, law, socio-legal studies, forensic psychology, critical psychology, or social statistics.

Related OER

The OER Recommendation aims to assist Member States to support the development and sharing of openly licensed learning and teaching materials, benefiting students, teachers, and researchers worldwide. It supports the creation, use and adaptation of inclusive and quality OER, and facilitates international cooperation in this field through five Action Areas, namely (i) building the capacity of stakeholders to create, access, re-use, adapt and redistribute OER; (ii) developing supportive policy; (iii) encouraging inclusive and equitable quality OER; (iv) nurturing the creation of sustainability models for OER, and (v) facilitating international cooperation.

The OER Recommendation aims to assist Member States to support the development and sharing of openly licensed learning and teaching materials, benefiting students, teachers, and researchers worldwide. It supports the creation, use and adaptation of inclusive and quality OER, and facilitates international cooperation in this field through five Action Areas, namely (i) building the capacity of stakeholders to create, access, re-use, adapt and redistribute OER; (ii) developing supportive policy; (iii) encouraging inclusive and equitable quality OER; (iv) nurturing the creation of sustainability models for OER, and (v) facilitating international cooperation.

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