Psychology of Law: 3 Critical Empirical Legal Problems

Description

This tutorial explicates three critical examples of how psychology informs legal professionals of the problems that human behaviour brings to law and its practice.

Benefit of this resource and how to make the best use of it

Starting with an introduction to what psychology is, and what it is not, the tutorial moves to discuss and critically analyse key studies in psychological research demonstrating: the fallibility of forensic profiling, the malleability of human memory relevant to false memory syndrome, and finally the vulnerability of juries to prejudicial evidence. These key studies demonstrate how forensic profiling may sometimes mislead police investigations, how false memories can be planted in the mind of witnesses, and how prejudicing evidence, such as prior convictions, can bias trials in which very little other corroboration is evident. These thought provoking findings are presented in the context of core landmark findings within the psychology of law literatures, and will provide the student and lecturer with much to appraise and work with to advance complementary literatures within law, such as a critique of the rules of evidence and procedure. Finally, a select reading list is provided to aid the student and lecturer for future reference.

Related OER

The OER Recommendation aims to assist Member States to support the development and sharing of openly licensed learning and teaching materials, benefiting students, teachers, and researchers worldwide. It supports the creation, use and adaptation of inclusive and quality OER, and facilitates international cooperation in this field through five Action Areas, namely (i) building the capacity of stakeholders to create, access, re-use, adapt and redistribute OER; (ii) developing supportive policy; (iii) encouraging inclusive and equitable quality OER; (iv) nurturing the creation of sustainability models for OER, and (v) facilitating international cooperation.

The OER Recommendation aims to assist Member States to support the development and sharing of openly licensed learning and teaching materials, benefiting students, teachers, and researchers worldwide. It supports the creation, use and adaptation of inclusive and quality OER, and facilitates international cooperation in this field through five Action Areas, namely (i) building the capacity of stakeholders to create, access, re-use, adapt and redistribute OER; (ii) developing supportive policy; (iii) encouraging inclusive and equitable quality OER; (iv) nurturing the creation of sustainability models for OER, and (v) facilitating international cooperation.

Report an Issue

Name