10-dot Matrix Scorecard – A measure of employability for higher education curricula

Description

The 10-dot Matrix is a quick and easy way to assess how well employability is embedded in classroom activities or module assessments. The video explains how to use 10 key criteria (4 graduate attribute criteria and 6 employability criteria), to quantitatively or qualitatively measure employability in your module or programme.

Benefit of this resource and how to make the best use of it

The 10-dot Matrix Scorecard is a generic tool and can be applied to any activity, module or programme.

Some classroom activities and assessments are introduced to a module to boost its employability. ​Many lecturers enhance the employability of their modules with these activities and assessments, for example, with the introduction of industry-partnered assessment, practical exams using technology or software applications, non-assessed group presentations, role play or classroom problem-solving activities. ​The 10-dot Matrix is a quick and easy way to evaluate how much employability you are embedding in classroom activities or module assessments. This short video explains how to use the 10 key criteria, 4 graduate attribute criteria and 6 employability criteria, to quantitatively or qualitatively reflect on how well your chosen assessments and employability activities are embedding employability modules or programmes.

Related OER

The Toolkit includes an introduction to generative AI and lexicon of terms, guidelines for ethical use, recommended adjustments to common modes of assessment to mitigate against the potential risk of unethical use, and discipline-specific case studies of good practice that share innovative forms of learning, teaching and/or assessment.

This publication will be a helpful, collaborative resource to all teaching staff at and beyond TUS. It may also generate further ideas for improving practice and enhancing student engagement. This first compendium has led to further publications where ‘pedagogical communities of practice’ continue to share our knowledge.

The self-assessment guidelines contain policy-oriented questions with good practice examples from countries that have successfully implemented policies for FLPs in their higher education systems. These examples are drawn from the national case studies implemented under the IIEP research, as well as from a broader review of the literature. The guidelines also include key bibliographical references for further reading related to these policy questions.

The learner population in tertiary education is becoming increasingly diverse, and students’ lives are also increasingly complex. The responsibility on educational institutions to provide equitable access for all is now strongly embedded in Irish legislation, and national tertiary education strategies contain more specific goals to implement a Universal Design approach, (SOLAS, 2020; Higher Education Authority, 2022).

The aim is to move towards a system where ‘Inclusion is Everyone’s Business’, where all staff play their part in delivering an inclusive educational experience.

Universal Design, or UD for short, offers us an evidence-based approach to engender this mindset, and is increasingly seen as a central tenet of our response to rising diversity, (Centre for Excellence in Universal Design, 2022). But how can we embed a UD approach in our institutions?

That’s where ALTITUDE – the National Charter for Universal Design in Tertiary Education – comes in to play.

Funded by the HEA under PATH 4, the ALTITUDE Project is an extensive cross sectoral collaboration involving six national agencies, fifteen higher education (HE) institutions and six Education and Training Board (ETB) representatives, nominated by Directors of FET to represent the Further Education and Training sector.

The vision of the project looks to a future in tertiary education where ‘all learners are transformatively included through universal design in education’, deriving the name ALTITUDE. It seeks to move us in that direction by supporting HEIs and ETBs to make sustainable progress towards systemically embedding a UD approach…. – one which places human diversity at the heart of tertiary education design, and fosters student success for all learners.

The ALTITUDE Charter, and the associated toolkit and technical report, build on significant existing work on UD in the Irish tertiary education landscape (Kelly & Padden, 2018), and through these outputs, provides a clear roadmap for institutions to make progress.

Drawing from national and international literature, the Charter recommends key strategic enablers, which institutions should put in place over time to support the sustainable implementation of UD, and proposes collaborative action to work towards goals under 4 key pillars of our institutions:

– Learning, Teaching & Assessment;
– Supports, Services & Social Engagement;
– the Physical Environment;
– and the Digital Environment

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URL: https://toolkitemployability.wordpress.com/the10-dot-matrix/